Is Cupid at work? Polar bears Cranbeary and Lyutyik now seen sharing habitat on Alaska Zoo’s live bear web cam

Lyutyik and Cranbeary during one of the scenes from their successful introduction held at 9am on January 31st, 2019.

Lyutyik and Cranbeary during one of the scenes from their successful introduction held at 9am on January 31st, 2019.

The Alaska Zoo’s newest resident Cranbeary, a 16-year-old female polar bear, met her potential mate Lyutyik for the first time on Thursday, Jan. 31. While Lyutyik owes the Denver and Alaska Zoo staffs — not Cupid — for their matchmaking skills, initial signs point to the two polar bears being a great pair.

Watch the new friends for signs of a new romance through the polar bear web cam online. Visitors also have special opportunities to see them on days such as our $5 February Fridays and our upcoming Valentines for the Animals & Kids Free Day event on Saturday, February 16th.

“We are glad to see the bears are becoming companions and know the community is going to be excited to see Cranbeary and Lyutyik playing together,” said Pat Lampi, executive director of the Alaska Zoo.

Photos and videos of Cranbeary and Lyutyik can be found on the Alaska Zoo’s Facebook page.

The Alaska Zoo is a nonprofit organization that has provided a home for orphaned, injured and captive-born animals for 50 years. Open year-round, the zoo is dedicated to promoting conservation of Arctic and sub-Arctic species through education, research and community enrichment.